I spent this past Sunday with my father. The original intent was to spend the day at a car show in Carlisle, PA. Inclement weather changed those plans. Instead we took a trip to my brother’s to drop off an air conditioner.

During the drive, he asked about the camera I had brought along(Nikon D3300). One of the main reasons I went with a Nikon was because of the fond memories I had of a Nikon he owned. I had to ask what model and if he still had it, since I was probably 11 the last time I saw it. His is a currently inoperable Nikon F2.

We spent the next few hours at my brother’s. Installed an air conditioner, played with my nephew and set about on the trip back to my dad’s.

By this point it was late in the day and I needed to head home. Before I left my dad says, “Hold on.”

Walks into a room and comes back out with the bag pictured above.

“You can keep this stuff if it will work with yours, but I’m keeping the camera.”

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This was the camera bag which he kept all his accessories for his F2 in. I haven’t seen this since probably 1996 or so. I got chills seeing it again.

When I got home I opened it up.

Contents:

-Two polarizing filters and a focusing screen

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$31.50 in seventies money!

-Neat book

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-A Beslar near-zoom closeup filter

This had no covers on it and looks like it developed some sort of scum/mold on either end. Both ends cleaned up nicely and show no scratches, but whatever that stuff is it is on the inside as well. I might try to take it apart and clean it.

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-Albinar 760775 lens

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80-200mm/3.5 with a macro function

This thing weighs approximately 470lbs.

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-Vivitar 200 flash

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You may be wondering about the duct tape. When I was about 3, my father left the camera atop the dryer with the strap hanging off the side. It had one of those crazy straps that were prevalent then. You can probably guess, but I pulled it off the dryer and the flash broke off the camera upon impact with my skull. My young still soft skull likely saved the camera.

-This cool rig

Made by a company called Suntar.

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-Samigon 79209 Fisheye

I remember being fascinated by this as a child.

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I’m fascinated by it as an adult.

“I’m sorry, Dave. I’m afraid I can’t do that.”

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This is where he bought the camera itself. Doesn’t look like they are still in business.

Information on these items is sparse. From the little information I’ve found they’re definitely on the lower end but I’m excited to try them out. If any of you has more information on them let me know.