Take that, Blackbird ground speed check!

Early on Saturday morning I ventured out to a new remote location in Central Florida to catch the International Space Station flying over. The moon was nearly full, so I knew it was going to make the night sky a lovely shade of blue. The clouds were a lovely bonus. They were near the moon in the sky and helped create those lovely moon beams shining across the frame. The moon also lit up the trees and bushes, rather than them being a shadowy mess.

I took eight shots to get the pass, 30-second exposures at 18mm, f/3.5, and ISO 500. I used the first frame as the main shot. I isolated the ISS trail from the next seven and dropped them all on the first frame. I tried stacking all the frames together but the clouds were looking weird, so I opted for the method I just described. This freezes the stars rather than leaving little star trails. Unless I have a hour or more of star trails, I prefer the freeze them rather than having tiny trails which make the image look cluttered.

I was also trying to get an Iridium Flare but it didn’t happen. It would have been from one of the last original Iridium satellites still in orbit. But it’s been in a decaying orbit for a few months so it’s predicted flares don’t always happen. Oh well.

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I see several really large meteors and several other satellites, one of which was tumbling and causing weird flares every rotation. It was really cool to see that. Of course my camera wasn’t pointing at where that happened in the sky. That maybe have been the satellite I was waiting for as I found no record of anything else that should have been visible at that time and place.

Other than this, I’ve been kinda slacking on photos this past week. I need to fix that this week.