It’s been almost two and half years since I was able to get a meteor picture. Every attempt has had something go wrong. Full moons, sand fly bites, almost rolling the truck, and getting chased by an alligator have all thwarted attempts. But not this time, damn it!

The Leonid shower was peaking early Saturday morning. There was no moon and we had a completely clear and cloudless sky. I found a spot about 45 minutes away that had very little light pollution to the east. When I got out there, the sky was absolutely stunning.

I got set up and took some bullshit shots to get the focus right. There wasn’t much to focus on as it was so dark. Once the meteors started, I pointed the camera east, locked in the shutter release, and then sat back and enjoyed the show. The Leonids were better than predicted, so it was well worth the trip. I was just hoping that a few happened where I had the camera pointed.

After a while, a fog formed and settled in for a little bit. That seemed to clear up but then as the temperature dropped, we hit the dew point. Everything got wet in real fast. I let the camera fire off for a while until I felt that I really needed to check the lens. It was completely covered in water drops. Game over. At that point, I realized just how wet everything had gotten. Time to pack up and go home.

When I went through the shots, the last 15 or so minutes were worthless as the lens was covered in water. In the shots leading up to those, you could see where the edges of the lens were starting to fog up, leaving a clear ring in the center.

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But I got three meteors in frame. The header is the first one, just as the fog was forming. The other two were later when the lens was starting to fog up on the edges.

I did take 81 continuous 30-second exposures and stack them, which came out pretty neat.

I am really happy with how the foreground came out. It took a little editing to make it work rather than being completely hazed out from the fog. I will be heading back to this spot for future meteor showers and when the Milky Way is visible again.